Miege seeing benefits from InSite Technology

By Morgan Hellwig Ridell Marketing & Communications
Posted: September 30, 2016 - 10:30 AM



Top contender Bishop Miege and their powerhouse defense shined through last week to overpower Blue Valley North finishing week 4 with a (3-1) record. This season, The Stags have a secret weapon on the sidelines to not only ensure a winning defense, but also player safety.

Bishop Miege is one of 20 high schools in the greater Kansas City area that have incorporated the use of smart helmet technology into their football program. As part of a broader player health and safety program supported by McCarthy Auto Group and PrepsKC, Bishop Miege is one of five schools that received Riddell’s InSite Impact Response System, which features sensors pads (or player units) placed in select players’ helmets that alert the sideline to atypical head impact exposures based on the player’s level of play and position (i.e., high school, linebacker).

The appeal of a system like Riddell InSite is that is provides team staff with actionable information about player head impact exposure, but maybe equally as valuable is how InSite can develop student athletes into better players. Coaches are often comparing alert history with game film to identify players using improper technique, which can help them limit unnecessary head impact exposure.

Coach Jon Holmes of Bishop Miege has personally witnessed the benefits of implementing InSite into his program.

“We have changed some of the drills we have done. It is also very helpful during games,” Holme said. “It is hard to see every time a player gets banged up. The monitor system allows our trainer to check on the player immediately to assure no injury was sustained.”

Every year, more and more schools are adopting Riddell InSite. Nationwide there are over 600 programs and over 17,000 athletes using Riddell InSite from youth to college competition. Coach Holmes has made ensuring the safety of his players a top priority, which is the key to success in his program and why he’s joined the smarter football movement.