Athletic Trainer Spotlight: Megan Burki

By Sports Medicine & Performance Center staff
Posted: September 14, 2015 - 11:18 AM



Megan Burki joined the Sports Medicine & Performance Center in July 2014. She works as head athletic trainer for Shawnee Mission East High School.

Burki is an integral part of the athletic program at the school. She works closely with coaches and parents to ensure student athletes are prepared to perform at their maximum potential. Most of all, she works to ensure they are safe and injury-free.

“Gaining the trust of the players, parents and coaches is so important in our job,” said Burki. “When you’re there and they know who you are, they will come to you more often.”

Concussion management is a key area of concern for Burki. This year she worked closely with the football coach to look into helmet liners and to implement more neck-strengthening exercises that will help prevent future cervical injuries.

As a former high school and college athlete, Burki says she knows how important it is for players to have access to athletic trainers. Burki played soccer and volleyball in high school and was on the rowing team at Kansas State University.

“I spent a lot of time in weight rooms, and I know how important it is to work closely with athletic trainers on injury prevention exercises,” said Burki. “I think that’s what made me realize I wanted to pursue it as a career.”

Burki has her Bachelor of Science in athletic training from Kansas State University and a master’s degree in kinesiology from the University of North Texas. She is also a member of the National Athletic Trainers Association.

She worked at the University of North Texas with the women’s softball and soccer teams for more than 5 years and recently moved back to the Kansas City area to be close to her family.

You can find her on Twitter @meburki.

For more sports medicine articles and information on the Sports Medicine & Performance Center at the University of Kansas Hospital, go to sportsmedicine.kumed.com or follow @KUSportsMed1 on twitter.

 


 

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